Geek things we all think about sometimes...

Time To Make an iPhone and Android App For Girlfriend Social

I figure its about time I get on making mobile versions of +Girlfriend Social  – http://www.girlfriendsocial.com … I code php, mysql, html, css etc but have never even looked into mobile development…. Today that changes….

I've already designed and use a very basic html version of the site that displays mobile screen resolution content. 

The mobile app will have features similar to a members site. Push notification for messages received on the main website,  view profile and events, maybe eventually geo target local app members to you…..

Anyone have any good suggestions, websites, books etc to start on the mobile coding curve?

#iphone   #appdevelopment   #appdevelopers   #android  

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98 Comments
  1. Ian Thomas says

    Jumping from web to Objective-C/Java is not a cake walk. You may want to consider using a tool such as PhoneGap to quickly build out an Android and IOS application until you can afford to pay for a quality application.

  2. Mathew Hanley says

    Place ratings? Not the usual ratings but how good they are places to go. I know I'm a man but I'm an ideas man 😉

  3. John Hart says

    Have you thought about starting with a responsive web design, using the skills you already have to help mobile users access the site?  You can use that to buy you time to learn mobile development and get a native app written without a "rush to market" mentality.

    Sometimes a native app isn't the best route to take initially, especially if you're doing the development yourself.

  4. Amanda Blain says

    I should add there is already a mobile web version of the site… And i am not worried about "learning a new language" I'm self taught already… coded all of GFS both front end and back end..  all by myself 🙂

  5. Catrina Murray says

    Sounds great i'll check it out.

  6. Omiyefa Oluwafikunayomi says

    good talk my boss

  7. Michael Lee Johnson says

    You're better off designing the site responsively  cross platform for all resolutions, browsers and device types, alongside geo-serving your sites content to different countries, monetizing for multiple locales. — And then once you have done that, create the native complementary apps for iPhone, Android and Windows handhelds. – Maximizing reach, awareness and profits.

  8. Jay McHugh says

    +John Hart is likely right (at least in the beginning). You could roll out a mobile version of your site to start with. That way you'll be able to kill all the birds with one stone.

  9. Amanda Blain says

    Maybe i better edit the main post… There is already a html mobile version of the site.. the main site already geo targets locally.. .. i am at the .. "native complementary apps" point .. hence this post..

  10. John Hart says

    +Jay McHugh She seems dead set on a mobile app, which is why I continued a path that direction.  Personally I'd say stick with a responsive site and ignore an app.  🙂

    Having a separate mobile site doesn't cover all bases, +Amanda Blain.  We're rolling out a responsive redesign on Monday for Fathead that covers 6 resolutions, everything from widescreen monitors to tablets to 300px wide phones.  This allows our content creators to build content once and have it work across every platform instantly and frees up our limited dev resources to work on other projects instead of maintaining a site and a mobile app.  I'm sure you have better things to do than code an app for the next 6 months.  🙂

  11. Michael Lee Johnson says

    A mobile html version is just a add-on, everything needs to be integrated and wrapped together properly. — It makes a big difference.

  12. Abraham Williams says

    I generally regard Pragmatic Programmer books to be top notch. They have a number of Android and iOS books: http://pragprog.com/

  13. Amanda Blain says

    Hmmm Perhaps im missing something basic here… Many girls on the site want "an app from the app store" that they can use on their phone that will give them push notifications of new messages on the site… This is my number 1 feature request. Telling them to "go to the website on their phone to login" isn't in their plan…   

    I don't know anything about this area.. so perhaps its easy as packaging the site into a mobile version of the app that will appear in the store…  since it seems that is what you are mostly suggesting… but then i'd need advice on how to do that. 🙂

  14. Martin Heine says

    How do you know I'm not a 'chick' also can a guy be 'chick in Europe?

    Posting a photo with a newspaper and the date of publishing may work, but you could fake that…. Maybe video face to face authentication only and photocopy of an I D card… Or signature… Food for thought?

  15. Peter Hayduk says

    The following books and web sites are helping a lot. Especially the android developer site is awesome and full of information. All other problems can be solved with stackoverflow. Hope this helps.

    Also I love the libraries from +Jake Wharton. They help a lot to provide an android 4.x style for older devices.

    Books
    http://www.deitel.com/Books/Android/AndroidforProgrammers/tabid/3606/Default.aspx (I own it)
    http://www.amazon.com/Smashing-Android-Magazine-Book-Series/dp/1118387287 (Will I buy soon)

    Websites
    http://developer.android.com
    http://www.androiduipatterns.com
    http://stackoverflow.com

    Libraries
    http://jakewharton.com

  16. Amanda Blain says

    There is a feedback feature on the site for women who have met up in real life.. kinda like ebay feedback… +Martin Heine .. otherwise.. when men who sign up through all the pretty pink… come out with "oh hey im actually a dude" they get reported and removed pretty quick… 

    Women are there to meet other women for friendship… The men are wasting their time and get that pretty quickly. 

    This is about mobile app development though.

  17. Siegfried Hirsch says

    Me neither is a mobile developer, but if you are looking to code for both iphone and android, you should take a look at apps, that help to keep the codebase together.

    Maybe you could take a look at Titanium appcelerator: Titanium allows you to write apps in an abstract way with JavaScript and then compile it to a mix of JavaScript and native code. This gives you a native look on iPhone and Android with only a single JavaScript code base.

    http://www.appcelerator.com/platform

  18. Christopher Capano says

    I develop Android in Eclipse but I have colleagues who code in LiveCode because it can generate native ios and android apps.

  19. Abraham Williams says

    +Amanda Blain since you already have a mobile website the fastest way to bootstrap mobile notifications is to use Twilio to send texts with links to the new content: http://www.twilio.com/

  20. John Hart says

    +Amanda Blain For notifications you will need an app, but I highly suggest you start small and work from there.  App development is a whole new ballgame, for instance there is no simple CSS tricks for multiple resolutions so layout needs a lot more planning, wireframing, and development time.  Perhaps just building out the notification framework would be best and when clicked it simply links them back to the messages portion of the site.  This would allow you to focus on the core parts of mobile development, the web services that will be required and how to display small bits of info on a users device.  From there you can expand out.

    Just be aware you're talking about two totally new languages here.  Java and C.  There's a whole new set of challenges here — not saying it's not possible, it's just a rough road.  I've been building Java apps since the early days and it still took me a few months before I had a solid app for Android.  (And that was just a test app with minimal functions.)  I've also done C programming for almost 20 years and when I wrote my first iOS app I thought I was going to throw the phone across the room a number of times every day for months.

    Nothing you learned from web development will be useful in mobile app development.

  21. Tom Dumas says

    how bout and it's supporters…!!!

  22. Mohammad Eshbeata says

    Titanuim = Javascript for multi mobile platforms

  23. Amanda Blain says

    Why do I keep hearing about HTML5 as the future of app development.. yet no on has mentioned it here? Something more like this http://phonegap.com/ ?

  24. John Hart says

    +Amanda Blain That's what responsive web design implies.  🙂

  25. Jason Pillow says

    Sounds pretty exciting. Where do I sign up for beta testing? =P

  26. Leo Deegan says

    If you're going to go it on your own, it might help to do one at a time (say, release iOS first). Getting user feedback data early helps.

  27. Mohammad Eshbeata says

    +Amanda Blain  Titanuim is more like phonegap but its build over javascript which one of the best i ever try , you could once for multiple http://www.appcelerator.com/

  28. Amanda Blain says

    Hmmmm… +PhoneGap do you do all the stuff i mentioned here? 🙂

    +Mohammad Eshbeata +Siegfried Hirsch Hmmm Titanuim looks good too…  Will have to compare the two to see which is better/easier… 

    Anyone else have suggestions similar to the above ideas… ? Thanks to all who responded thus far.

  29. Martin Heine says

    I'm not convinced this is a good idea…

  30. Martin Heine says

    It could end up like a men's club or the tea party…

  31. Michael Lee Johnson says

    +Amanda Blain – Html 5 is just a buzz term. Titanium is probably the best and phonegap is far too basic for your needs.

  32. Stacy S says

    From experience moving our product to mobile apps, if you can move your infrastructure to rest based service interfaces then the app and the frontend all share the same services.

    This makes maintence a LOT easier. Maintence and ongoing development is the area of software development where the rookies overlook or ignore in exchange for "just get it out there".

  33. Panah Rad says

    I use this site: http://mobile.tutsplus.com/ and tutsplus stuff in general for trying new things. I know some folk use http://mobileroadie.com/ and sites like that. But I prefer coding it myself

  34. Jay McHugh says

    I did not know that you already had a mobile version of your site. Have you considered doing your development on github so that you could get help with the coding and bug fixes? Or, were you planning on selling the app and therefore wanted to keep the code secret? I am trying to add android deelopment to my bag of tricks and would like to help out (once I can actually do something useful).

  35. Lee Clarke says

    +Amanda Blain  I would agree with +Stacy S when it comes to building your back end keep it as separate REST services, this will allow you to keep the native apps simple and allow them to focus on doing what UIs are there for, providing a good user experience,  Don't let UIs think too much. We designed our entire architecture around this approach when I worked at that little entertainment company… We cranked out a mobile app sitting on the REST api that backs up the web app in a very short time.

    On html5… for what it's worth FB has pulled mobile support for HTML5 claiming it was a huge mistake.. Many are still using it with responsive design packages such as Sencha and JQuery but I have heard more then once that a native app provides a more consistent experience not to mention you get all the goodness of the native OS such as notifications.

    search "facebook html5 mistake" for more info on the HTML5 mobile debate.

  36. Ryan Moore says

    the guy at our work learned ios from that university's online videos… berkley?

  37. Sophie Wrobel says

    I'm very much a 'learning by doing' person. The biggest part of the curve is design – implementation is easy enough.

    1. Performance. There was a great article on client vs server side architecture comparing siri and google's search. Most applications won't be as clear-cut as that, but do think twice about how performant javascript vs. serverside processing is going to be.

    2. User patterns Design for mobile first, then the main site – this really helps you become aware of what really is important on your site. Menus need to be accessible – but not necessarily a navbar, which kills screen space. Actually, try browsing some of your 'essential' desktop sites via a mobile emulator, and you'll get a feel soon enough for what is painful.

    On apps: I develop on Android on an Asus Transformer – developing on a desktop is painful thanks to the slow emulator. If you want notifications, HTML 5 will not help: HTML runs in the browser sandbox, notifications in the mobile OS. But app development is quite different than web scripting, as already mentioned, Google Developers is quite thorough.

  38. Ryan Moore says

    oh, and +Amanda Blain I posted on the blog the other day about how the slideshows for +AndroidTO are now all available

  39. Tristan Isfeld says

    Developing mobile is very fun, but there are lots of resources available to do this. Have you looked into phonegap?
    http://www.phonegap.com
    You wont need to lean the mobile's native language and they compile it for you, so you can use js, html, and css.

  40. Amanda Blain says

    Does phone gap handle push notifications well? +Tristan Isfeld …  that the main feature i'm looking for here… 🙂

  41. Tristan Isfeld says

    +Amanda Blain it sure does. They also use accelerometer, compass, storage, contacts, geolocation… etc.. They essentially do their best to work with all mobile events and features of the major o.s. You just use their api, and then they compile it to the native language. So you have to learn a lot of functions and objects, but, then you can use any feature you would like. Here, look at the api
    http://docs.phonegap.com/en/2.2.0/guide_getting-started_index.md.html

  42. Ian Thomas says

    PhoneGap is significantly better than titanium. The problem with titanium is if something fails to work right on some device, you are completely at the mercy for the devs to fix it.

  43. Mike Jansen says

    Personal opinion: avoid cross-platform where you develop once and output multiple native apps (android, ios, etc). Nice in theory, reality not so nice.

    Native app development is a decent sized under taking, especially since each platform is so different. Don't under-estimate the potential amount of learning you'll need to do just to get something more than a trivial "hello world" app.

  44. Amanda Blain says

    It seems this is turning into a PC VS MAC debate…. i wasn't aware there was so much conflicting information in this.. but i guess that makes sense… people who only code in java/C would think poorly of something that is Cross platform HTML5… and vice versa….  Same thing I find in web development… (WHY ON EARTH USE PHP SAYS ASP GUYS)… 😉

    I guess its also why i've been confused and hesitant on starting it… I'm not a major billion dollar corporation so phonegap or titanium is really looking like a good solution at this time…

    Also interesting note here… I'm doing this for the joy of learning… 🙂 Appreciate everyones comments… and keep em coming. 🙂

  45. Geo T says

    Wow way to go amanda! What will this app be able to do. Meaning more than it already does?

  46. Tristan Isfeld says

    +Mike Jansen I agree with you that native development is significantly better than cross platform development in many instances, however, the power of devices now-a-days mitigates this issue rendering the differences quite negligible in instances where the app doesn't require the need for highly optimized code, for example a photoshop mobile. 

    There are many factors which call for cross-platform development, especially in Amanda's situation. Developing the apps natively across the many devices, would be incredibly cost ineffective for her, and exhaustively time consuming. Also, don't forget, that phonegap compiles to the native languages of the devices, so future optimization will be possible.

  47. Liz Krane says

    I agree with the phonegap/Titanium suggestion if you have a lot of iPhone and Android users and want to save time. But as an amateur going from web (PHP) to Android (and a tiny bit of iPhone tinkering), I have to say the transition isn't that hard at all! It's certainly a time investment, but a fun one. 🙂 So I'd say if you want to learn new languages anyway, then there's no reason to shy away from native development! I'd start with whichever platform is used by the majority of your users, use that to get their feedback on the design, and then make it on other platforms if it seems worthwhile after that.

  48. Eileen O'Duffy says

    +Rory Glynn Can you advise Amanda?

  49. Ghulam Mohi-Ud-Din says

    Hi

  50. Ghulam Mohi-Ud-Din says

    Ffg

  51. Roberto Inetti says

    +Amanda Blain, if you want to learn a new language, go native. If you need mobile Apps and don't really care about objective C, Java or C++ then I'd recommend you to try +PhoneGap as other mentioned already. Either way, best of luck.

  52. Shahla Ghasemi says

    Hi,how active u r and like to be in ur social group

  53. Mark Wolfskehl says

    Android in Action from Manning is good, though the edition I have covers Android 2. You'll want to pick up Java first though.

  54. Mark Wolfskehl says

    I'm partial toward native myself. I think it makes a difference in terms of quality.

  55. Michael Bradley says

    http://www.bignerdranch.com/books

    And use whatever script/code works best for you.   The world won't end because you choose one over the other.

  56. Jason Bunting says

    Considering your app's likely requirements, i.e. not too technically challenging (you're not writing a 3D mmorpg or anything near that level), and considering you'd like to get to market quickly, and you already know web technologies, you really are going to get more mileage using something like +PhoneGap or +Appcelerator's Titanium than learning the native languages and the idiosyncrasies thereof.

    There are always software engineers that will claim native is the only way to go; yet if you ask them why they don't just write code in binary or an assembly language, they will tell you their higher-level languages (Obj-C, Java, etc.) provide nice abstractions, quicker implementations, etc. than their lower-level counterparts…

    Well, then, that's largely the same argument for using the two tools previously mentioned, rather than their native counterparts.

    🙂

    Learning the native languages and the specifics of their development process may be beneficial if you are thinking about parlaying the skills so gained into a professional career; otherwise you'll find you are spending far more time dealing with stuff you don't want to do and less and less time getting your app completed.

    Now the decision boils down to: which one of those two tools? I've used Titanium before, but not PhoneGap. As with anything, be careful to separate the facts from the oft-attached emotional opinions that often accompany them. 🙂

  57. Mike Jansen says

    +Tristan Isfeld I'm not sure how the "power of devices now-a-days" makes cross-platform stuff better.  It really doesn't have anything to do with power as it does how each particular platform is used, and the least-common-denominator approach you have to do to make things work.  Cross-platform development environments can get you up and running quickly and may be useful for "entry level" apps.  

    And perhaps this would be sufficient for +Amanda Blain 's initial application needs.  But (and admittedly this comes more from over 20 years in software development experience and not specific experience with any mobile development cross-platform tools) once you start doing anything non-trivial or want your android apps to behave like android apps and your ios apps to behave like ios apps, the cross-platform-ness starts to become more of a burden than a help.

    As long as a cross-platform tool is understood, that's fine.  I just don't think most people understand the limitations and end up buying into them and then investing time and effort only to realize that they don't really fit their long-term needs.

  58. Amanda Blain says

    +500 +Jason Bunting …. If i could frame your response.. i would 🙂

  59. Amanda Blain says

    Hmmm.. well i outlined my needs in the post there +Mike Jansen …. it wont ever really be much beyond that… It's mainly the push notify of "YOUVE GOT MAIL" more than anything else…  Should there be a problem?

  60. Mike Jansen says

    +Amanda Blain , I agree with +Jason Bunting 's response for the most part.  If you're only using it for "you've got mail", perhaps right now a cross-platform tool to get you going is the right approach.  But just be aware of the limitations and that you may outgrow those tools quickly if your app takes off and you're looking to expand it more.  That's all I'm trying to get you thinking about 🙂  Know the cost, know the limitations.  Make your choice being informed.  Then you can have confidence 🙂

  61. Amanda Blain says

    Guess thats what im asking.. where do the limitations start? Whats an example of something that i could not code on a cross platform app…  I know you're a good coder so I appreciate your input +Mike Jansen ..

  62. Amanda Blain says

    Guess thats what im asking.. where do the limitations start? Whats an example of something that i could not code on a cross platform app…  I know you're a good coder so I appreciate your input +Mike Jansen ..

  63. Mark Wolfskehl says

    +Amanda Blain It depends what you want to do and how slick you want it to come off. I do think native creates a better quality experience. However if you plan on doing everything yourself and still doing both Android and iPhone, one of the cross platform tools might be most realistic for you. Personally JavaScript seems a big mess and gives me a headache. I'd rather code in Java any day. But to each her own 😉

  64. Mark Wolfskehl says

    +Amanda Blain It depends what you want to do and how slick you want it to come off. I do think native creates a better quality experience. However if you plan on doing everything yourself and still doing both Android and iPhone, one of the cross platform tools might be most realistic for you. Personally JavaScript seems a big mess and gives me a headache. I'd rather code in Java any day. But to each her own 😉

  65. Jason Bunting says

    +Mike Jansen, right before you made statements concerning the limitations of cross-platform tools and the apps they produce, you stated that you lack "specific experience with any mobile development cross-platform tools."

    The fact is, very significant applications are built every day with the specific tools myself and others are referring to. I suggest you check out http://www.appcelerator.com just to get an idea of the types of apps that are being written with their tool – you'll find they are hardly "entry level" apps. 

    I believe +Amanda Blain  would do quite well investing her time in such tools considering she will be doing the work. If a time comes that her app and platform are successful enough to warrant some now-unforeseen need for a feature that would only be possible with native app development, she can probably hire someone with the skills to do it at that point. 

    🙂

    ..

  66. Jason Bunting says

    +Mike Jansen, right before you made statements concerning the limitations of cross-platform tools and the apps they produce, you stated that you lack "specific experience with any mobile development cross-platform tools."

    The fact is, very significant applications are built every day with the specific tools myself and others are referring to. I suggest you check out http://www.appcelerator.com just to get an idea of the types of apps that are being written with their tool – you'll find they are hardly "entry level" apps. 

    I believe +Amanda Blain  would do quite well investing her time in such tools considering she will be doing the work. If a time comes that her app and platform are successful enough to warrant some now-unforeseen need for a feature that would only be possible with native app development, she can probably hire someone with the skills to do it at that point. 

    🙂

    ..

  67. Jason Bunting says

    Those who don't know may not realize that these tools compile the apps created thereby down to native code and use native components. Android apps created by Titanium, for example, are, at their core, Java apps. Same for iOS apps created by Titanium. I don't know anything about PhoneGap, but I'm willing to bet the same is true for that tool.

  68. Jason Bunting says

    Those who don't know may not realize that these tools compile the apps created thereby down to native code and use native components. Android apps created by Titanium, for example, are, at their core, Java apps. Same for iOS apps created by Titanium. I don't know anything about PhoneGap, but I'm willing to bet the same is true for that tool.

  69. Mark Wolfskehl says

    Android native development is pretty easy. You can get up and running pretty quickly. If you don't know java already you'll have to pick it up. But Java is pretty easy too. iPhone is a different beast altogether but if you're not sure what you want to do it may be best to focus on one until you have something people like.

  70. Mark Wolfskehl says

    Android native development is pretty easy. You can get up and running pretty quickly. If you don't know java already you'll have to pick it up. But Java is pretty easy too. iPhone is a different beast altogether but if you're not sure what you want to do it may be best to focus on one until you have something people like.

  71. Liz Quilty says

    hmm i was going to comment since i just saw it, but i see everything is pretty much covered
    my only idea/suggestion is if you have a mobile site you could use one of those sites like andromomo which just generate it, then submit it to android and iphone

    Some cost, some suck, google and find more – here are a few
    http://www.apps-builder.com/en/home
    http://www.appsbar.com/
    http://www.mobileappwizard.com/
    Android only
    http://www.andromo.com/

  72. Liz Quilty says

    hmm i was going to comment since i just saw it, but i see everything is pretty much covered
    my only idea/suggestion is if you have a mobile site you could use one of those sites like andromomo which just generate it, then submit it to android and iphone

    Some cost, some suck, google and find more – here are a few
    http://www.apps-builder.com/en/home
    http://www.appsbar.com/
    http://www.mobileappwizard.com/
    Android only
    http://www.andromo.com/

  73. George Loughlin says

    I would suggest Titanium Appcelerator to create an app using HTML, Javascript and CSS as well as APIs and addons. That would allow you to maximize your existing skillsets.

  74. Mike Jansen says

    +Amanda Blain, my advice is more generic advice based on a couple decades of software development experience. I'd just use it as food-for-thought as you investigate the specific knowledge that +Jason Bunting and others are providing.

  75. Patricia Merkel says

    We could use someone like you at #ThoughtWorks

  76. Robert Pitt says

    +Jason Bunting

    although I agree with you comment regarding using a higher level language in the stack if your not looking at the language, but more the app, I think you have to look at long term management of the app, phone gap and others are relatively new, considering the chances of issue using a new tool like phone gap vs learning java which has had year's of bug fix iterations, performance testing etc. It may be better to choose native. Also if this message does not make much sense the I apologise as I have had a fair few beers 😛

  77. Mike Jansen says

    +Robert Pitt , even though you have had a few beers and your position may be slightly biased 😉 I agree with the point of choosing something more proven if you are looking for long-term investment.  However, from what I gather, +Amanda Blain  is looking for a way to enter the mobile app market.  As much as I personally cringe at short-term approaches, I wouldn't have my current job if my boss hadn't just done what it took to get the product out there.  On the other hand, we are paying a bit for those short-term decisions now.  It's not always an easy call.

  78. Jason Bunting says

    +Robert Pitt – if it were not for the fact that I know Amanda isn't looking at creating the next Angry Birds or Microsoft Office replacement, I would recommend going with Java or Obj-C; but given that she isn't doing anything with such demanding requirements, coupled with the fact that I know enough about Titanium to know whether it is worthy or not, and I would bet money she will get a better return on her investment of time going with Titanium. While Titanium isn't as old as Java, it also wasn't born yesterday. As I mentioned before, many big companies have written non-trivial apps using Titanium, which implies it isn't a mere toy. I've written an Android app in Java and with Titanium, and the latter was a much faster development experience. Also, as I've mentioned, Titanium compiles down to native apps, so there's no performance difference.

    The other consideration here is Amanda's current skill set – not only would she need to learn Java and Obj-C (her audience surely needs both), but the development environments and associated tools; it just doesn't add up, in my mind.

  79. Jason Bunting says

    +Amanda Blain – here's a (3 year old) post on StackOverflow that discusses some of the differences between PhoneGap and Titanium:

    http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1482586/comparison-between-corona-phonegap-titanium

    That may be a good starting point for ideas on the differences of each, but considering how old the posts are, it may also be worth looking into any of the specifics that you feel would affect your decisions by going directly to the respective websites and/or dedicated forums, etc.

    Hope that helps…

  80. Marlon Revelett says

    From the stated requirements (users want an "app" and "notifications") a really quick way to deliver a first iteration would be an app with a self-contained browser window pointing to a variation of the mobile site. Add some notification functionality and you're in business. Baby steps.

    This appraoch (wrap a web browser) is more common than you might imagine.  You greatly simplify the issue of supporting different devices while still getting your feet wet in app development. You can make general "updates to the app" instantaneously for all your users by updating the mobile site (deploy holiday themes, etc). Major updates (changes to app-embedded notification code) would still require normal app revisions.  

    Be up front that the app "communicates with the website at each step to ensure the freshest data" so users are aware that selecting app options will not return "instant" results.  If you're clever with the look and feel and make the content look "app-like" then many users may not even realize they are actually browsing a website.

  81. Victor Damopoli says

    .

  82. Mike Jansen says

    +Jason Bunting, you have got me interested in titanium… Still a bit skeptical until I try it out for myself, but definitely interested. Since you've posted positives about Titanium, here's a couple "balancing" points that I'll be looking into further (based on reading the links you shared):

    1. Does not compile into a native app, but… Appears Titanium is a native app that runs your code (javascript) which accesses the Titanium API which is a bridge to native functionality. This isn't necessarily a negative, just a clarification.

    1a. (actually a positive) I do like that it appears now that you write purely in javascript and it renders a completely native UI. Not that I'm a huge fan of javascript outside of the browser, but this approach makes your apps closer to a purely native app.

    2. Bugs. From one of the detailed comments, at least as of 2010 and from the authors perspective, there seemed to be an emphasis on increasing Titanium functionality and not stability and that significant bugs were an issue. No detaila but definitely something important to get a current status on.

  83. wahedin Nabizada says

    this is y bastter for every one and i wasih every one will like this that you make it so lovely….

  84. Victor Damopoli says

    How do you do

  85. Nawaz Zeshan says

    can i join this social site

  86. Amanda Blain says

    +Patricia Merkel Thoughtworks is a cool company 😉

  87. Jason Bunting says

    My unsolicited comments on your points, +Mike Jansen – 

    1. Completely spot-on – one thing to consider is the fact that the JavaScript engines of the respective platforms are ridiculously fast when compared to engines of years ago, because most of them have moved from a purely-interpreted model to either partially or fully compiled-to-native-code engines, so the fact that it's JavaScript vs. Java isn't significant. Also, if we're going to be pendantic about things, Java isn't 'native' for Android, so much as 'typical' – to develop truly native apps for Android, one has to use C or C++. 

    1a. I assume you are alluding to the fact that the UI aspect of development is not done using HTML and CSS? And, for what it is worth, many of JavaScript's perceived inadequacies are founded in what I attribute to misunderstandings and biases based on ignorance or rumor; granted, it lacks (or implements differently) what many assume to be required language features, yet it stands up very well on its own, especially once one becomes familiar with it in a non-trivial way. To each his own. 🙂

    2. Every platform has the potential for bugs, 'known' issues, etc. and I'd approach the same in Titanium no differently than I would working in Java or C# – i.e. make sure I'm aware of such things as they apply to my use cases and plan accordingly. In 2 year's time, hopefully any of the then-extant issues have been addressed, to make way for new ones! 🙂

    Thanks for taking time to look into Titanium, it's nice to have a discussion to become better informed and see things from other sides. That said, after reading more about PhoneGap because of this discussion, I'm curious as to whether or not it, rather than Titanium, may be a better fit for +Amanda Blain's current situation. Of course, that's something only she will be able to determine.

  88. Terry Laporte says

    How do you host your site?  Do you extend to a third party server side (Go Daddy) or do you host the site yourself (ChangeIP)?

  89. Rajeev Sharma says

    wait till some registerar (Go Mummy) emerge, ensure no male administrator manage the server, bla.. bla… bla.. bla… 😉

  90. Michael Pjura says

    Check out http://phonegap.com/.

    Makes the web dev to mobile app dev gap surmountable.

  91. Mark Wolfskehl says

    +Amanda Blain Are you expecting to generate revenue either directly or indirectly from the app? I think that should be a big consideration. If so, you should seriously think about going native. I just don't think there is any comparison between a really well done slick native ui and anything you can do with a web based framework. If you don't care about making money you may just want to slap something together quickly and not invest a lot. But if you expect to make money, users are very impatient with anything less than perfect these days, and it only takes one minor misstep to trash your reputation for good with the consumer. If you go in this direction I suggest you pick one platform and get the app right. If users like it and use it, then you can think about investing in the other platform. But coding for Android is so different from coding for iOS it doesn't make sense to work on both in parallel.

  92. 万小清 says

    hi!

  93. Wyn Williams says

    +Amanda Blain I) second +Michael Pjura we use Xcode for example for the base then build using Phonegap / Cordova libraries on top, makes it nicely portable and pretty easy to learn, especially with the GUI tools you get nowadays. we have made a few pretty good social apps and we make some more complicated ones for clients (BT etc) using that method, good luck / have fun 🙂

  94. Ghulam Mohi-Ud-Din says

    I can visit toranto & see to amanda blain

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